Artist's Statement

I think I always wanted to be an artist.  From the time that I was very young, even with no training, my art and especially my crafting was where I found peace and solace, and I often astounded my peers and associates with my output.  But it never occured to me that it was a viable lifestyle for me... that my work was worthy... that anyone would actually spend their hard-earned dollars on aesthetic things that originated from my mind, hands, and heart.  And so I went through college and pursued a career in the  Corporate World, although ironically my job was directing production and purchasing inventory pieces... i.e.
msking things.  I didn't realize it at the time.


                                .

Fast forward 30 years.  I became dredfully ill with a chronic illness and was forced off the job and onto disability.  It was my worst nightmare come true!  I languished in my home for a couple of years, depressed out of my mind and, although still productive with fiber arts, was not connecting the dots.


My transformation came thanks to my friends who insisted that I attend a Weaving Conference with them, despite my health issues.  I decided to take one "weird" class - one not having anything to do with textiles - which was taught by Robin Atkins and in it, we made beaded tassels. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                            
I knew within 10 minutes of starting our project that I had found my life's passion, and it was something that I was not just proficient in but excited about.   I started making jewelry, taking more beading classes, making more jewelry.  A lot of jewelry... and I wore it around.

                                                                                                                   
My work generated unanticipated interest and excitement.  I was shocked when the first person asked if they could buy a piece.  More shocked when another did the same.  And I almost fell over when I got my first official private ongoing client!  But I still doubted myself.   


                                                                          
                                                                                               
It wasn't until very recently, though, that I realized that I was making a contribution to society; making jewelry worthy of notice and respect.  I was approached to teach what I was producing.  My work was starting to be noticed on Etsy and several art bloggers wrote about my pieces.  I had been a finalist in several beading contests, but then in 2013, I won a Silver Medal in the Seed Beading Contest sponsored by Fire Mountain Gems.  That win was followed by my winning piece appearing on the back cover of Beadwork Magazine in October, 2013!  And other magazines followed.

                                                                                                                       

Now, as I continue to educate myself on different ways to apply beads and other materials to make things of beauty, I am starting to also show my work at trade and crafts shows.  I have been approached by a major gallery here in Los Angeles who wants to show my work.  I am recognized by some of the Master Beaders - the ones who I love to take classes from - even before I've ever met them.  

                                                                                                                                                                                
Although I still work in many classifications of beaded jewelry and accessories, I am focusing my time more and more on fine, bead embroidered leather pieces. This is an area hardly explored by most beaders and I am very excited by the future!  

About the Artist:

Laura Silverman lives in Granada Hills with her husband, Eric, his four children, and a plethora of rescue animals.  She is happiest when she is in her studio, working and enjoying the views through the bank of picture windows there, seeing wild animals (even her pets although she actually referred to the "Wild" wild animals) running and flying through their property.